Posts Tagged ‘MapBox’

hurricane-evac

link to interactive map here

Following the Cartography and GIS Dorkshop I gave last weekend I was invited to give a 3 hour open-source Geo demonstration with QGIS, Tile Mill, and MapBox at a Trans-Disciplinary Design class taught by Mathan Rathinam, here at Parsons.  The class is dealing with issues relating to environmental hazards and disaster resilience in NYC, so to make the connection between the class and the Geo tools we used some spatial data from NYC Open Data. We pulled in two datasets; one for hurricane evacuation zones and another for evacuation centers. The zones have a classification from 1 – 6, with 1 being the highest at risk areas prone to flooding and 6 being the least. In the class I demonstrated how to load and style this data in TileMill using a sequential color scheme as demonstrated on Cynthia Brewer’s Color Brewer Cartography guideIn the map above I’ve refined the design a little further, using some advanced labeling with SVG icons from TileMill’s open-source Maki icon repository. I also used the MapBox API to add a “Find My Location” button that will drop an icon based on the user’s IP address.  Additionally, clicking on an icon will reveal it’s full address in the upper right hand corner.  I enjoyed teaching the material to the class and look forward to giving more workshops and demos, hopefully bringing in some guest speakers as well. Thanks again to Mathan and his class for having me, it was a pleasure.

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More mapping of NYC’s open-data, this time with CSV data of graffiti reports, rat sighting calls to 311, and wi-fi hotspots. Graffiti sites are shown in yellow, rat sighting locations in red, and wifi hotspots in blue.

Screen Shot 2013-09-14 at 12.30.06 PM

link to map here

The point of mapping this data is that there really isn’t a point, just how arbitrary datasets could be viewed amongst each other. Once again TileMill, QGIS, GDAL, and MapBox were the tools I used to create this map.

nyc-census-pop_sample

Link to interactive map

This Choropleth map shows the number people per acre by census track. Data was used from the 2010 Census and taken from NYC’s open-data website. 

Tools used include QGIS, TileMill, MapBox, and GDAL.

NYC 100 year Floodplain 2020

link to interactive map

An interactive map showing the estimated NYC 100 year Floodplain for 2020 that takes into account the influence of sea-level rise predictions by the New York City Panel on Climate Change.
Data is here and was processed using QGIS, GDAL, & TileMill. Hosted with MapBox.

Screen Shot 2013-09-13 at 7.11.51 PM

link to interactive map

I’ve used a tool called OpenPaths to hack my mobile device’s location data and have been playing around with visualizing it, previously using a javascript library called D3JS. This time however I created a visualization using open source GIS and web-mapping tools including TileMill from MapBox in the form of an open-source web-map. The user can zoom and pan to view the data while hovering the mouse over a point will display the date and time. At a smaller scale (eg. zoomed out) the overlapping data points become opaque showing where I’ve spent the most time. Upon zooming in the points become more dispersed. Despite the data not being entirely accurate, displaying this data raises questions of privacy and in a time of Snowden’s leaks on the NSA’s covert surveillance programs it seems appropriate to bring attention to the ways in which the government has been tracking those with mobile devices.