Posts Tagged ‘GDAL’

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link to interactive map

The inspiration for this map came from Rebecca Solnit’s Infinite City; an illustrative atlas that features a collection of maps and writings about San Francisco. One of my favorite maps in the book is titled; “Poison/Palate”. The map shows locations of sites designated as either a ‘palate’, ‘poison’, ‘poison/palate’ or ‘EPA Superfund.’  Farmers markets, organic farms and well known eateries are juxtaposed next to nuclear research laboratories, chemical plants, and Silicon Valley’s legacy of tech waste.  The map I made shows only locations of NYC’s farmers markets linked to their nearest superfund site (within city limits, their are many more just outside in other counties and New Jersey). With more time I would include other types of ‘palate’ and ‘poison’ sites such as notable NYC eateries and restaurants.  Further user interaction with the data would developed as well; such as the ability to search all sites from a certain distance of an address entered by the user.

Data was obtained from the EPA and NY State open-data.  CartoDB is being used to host and render the data live; a PostGIS SQL query links the two data-sets and a subtle light-grey base-map I imported from MapBox puts the data in context.  To process the data I used GDAL’s ogr2ogr utility to query out the 5 boroughs of farmers markets from all of NY.  I used QGIS to perform a spatial query on the EPA data to only select sites within the NYC boroughs (this could probably be done with ogr2ogr but I’m not certain).

*note: when searching for superfund data the EPA Environmental Dataset Gateway is a good place to start. Superfund sites are also known as “Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)”, a term that comes up a lot in the EPA websites.

**the list of NYC farmers markets I used appears incomplete. The dataset I originally downloaded from nyc open-data contains more records but the address data is not easily geocodable; there are many addresses like: “Crotona Park South & Clinton Ave, in Crotona Park” instead of the typical format of street address, city, state, zipcode. Given more time I could have reconciled the state and city datasets and included more market locations.

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Bike Collisions and Routes June 2013

Link to interactive map

This map shows cycling crashes recorded by the NYPD for June 2013, following the launch of Citibike in late May that year.  Bicycle lanes are shown color coded for off-street (green) or on street (purple), transitional (yellow), or null (grey). Ultimately my goal is to show where collisions tend to take place and if there has been an increase and in what areas following the launch of Citibike. This data only represents a sample of the dataset I collected, more collision data can be found hereThe map was created using CartoDB with QGIS and GDAL for inspecting and editing the geo-data prior to visualization.

NYC bicycle facility data is available here

Citibike station data is available here: which I believe is the live update.

More mapping of NYC’s open-data, this time with CSV data of graffiti reports, rat sighting calls to 311, and wi-fi hotspots. Graffiti sites are shown in yellow, rat sighting locations in red, and wifi hotspots in blue.

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link to map here

The point of mapping this data is that there really isn’t a point, just how arbitrary datasets could be viewed amongst each other. Once again TileMill, QGIS, GDAL, and MapBox were the tools I used to create this map.

nyc-census-pop_sample

Link to interactive map

This Choropleth map shows the number people per acre by census track. Data was used from the 2010 Census and taken from NYC’s open-data website. 

Tools used include QGIS, TileMill, MapBox, and GDAL.